Woodmen of the World spokesman Phillip Robertson shows Barkley Bridge fifth graders the U.S. Flag that flew over the USS Alabama during World War II. Durng World War II. |  Clif Knight
Woodmen of the World spokesman Phillip Robertson shows Barkley Bridge fifth graders the U.S. Flag that flew over the USS Alabama during World War II. Durng World War II. | Clif Knight

Archived Story

Barkley Bridge students learn flag history, etiquette

Published 9:33pm Thursday, February 28, 2013

Barkley Bridge Elementary School’s third, fourth and fifth grade students know a lot more about U.S. flag history and etiquette today than they did a week ago thanks to a hands on learning experience presented by Woodmen of the World Thur., Feb. 28.

Phillip Robertson, manager of community outreach for the Woodmen of the World North Alabama State Office in Hartselle, spoke to each class for an hour. He talked about the development of the American flag from its origin following the Revolutionary War to the present, using historic flags to illustrate its changes and a money game to test their knowledge of the flag history.

One of the unique flags he introduced and talked about was the one the late Lt. Michael Christian made from bits of his clothing while he was imprisoned in Vietnam for seven years.

Coincidentally, fifth grade teacher Pam Weaver revealed she is a niece of the famous war hero and was given the honor of telling his flag story to the fifth graders.

She reported that her uncle was able to keep his sanity and survive his terrible ordeal because he started each day by repeating the Lord’s Prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance and then turning his attention to working on the flag.

The money game consisted of 15 questions, ranging from “What should you do with an American flag that is beyond repair?” to “Who was the designer of the first official U.S. lag?” Monetary values ranging from $100 to $1 million were given for each correct answer.

Each student received a copy of the Woodmen of the World’s U.S. Flag Code and Guidelines.

Robertson said he gives the program on requests from schools, churches and other nonprofit organizations.

“We take patriotism very seriously,” he pointed out. “and strive to promote a deeper appreciation for our nation’s founding principles and its first and principal emblem, the U.S. flag.

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