Julia Belanger, head intern at the animal shelter, pets Podo, one of the shelter’s animals up for adoption. | Clif Knight
Julia Belanger, head intern at the animal shelter, pets Podo, one of the shelter’s animals up for adoption. | Clif Knight

No-Kill animal shelter looks for help entering second year

Published 11:39am Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The Morgan County Humane Society No-Kill Animal Shelter has come a long way since it opened its doors to abandoned and neglected pets a year ago, but it still needs more funding and volunteers, according to Director Robin Purdy.

The shelter marked its first anniversary with a cookout and open house Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. As part of the event, Decatur veterinarian Amanda Parker from Animal Tracks Veterinary Hospital, conducted a rabies vaccination clinic for a $10 per animal fee.

The shelter’s volunteers and several of its supporters, including State Senator Arthur Orr, daughter Anna, and son, Jack, attended the event.

“We’re so thankful to be here offering care for the animals that are abused and mistreated and need a good home,” said Purdy. “Our only wish is that we could do more. We’re not at full capacity now because we don’t have the resources and help to take care of that number. We need more contributions and volunteers.”

Purdy said the shelter is now affiliated with ASPCA and received a $5,000 grant from the organization.

“We’re using that money to spay and neuter pets,” Purdy said. “So far, we’ve funded over 100 pets.”

Purdy also said a cottage has been donated to the shelter.

“We’ll set it up behind the shelter and put it to good use,” Purdy said, “as soon as we find somebody who is willing to pick it up and deliver it.”

Among those attending the anniversary celebration was one of Purdy’s friends, Anthony Yates, a field officer for the Huntsville Animal Services Department.

“I’m very impressed with what Robin and her group started from scratch several years ago,” Yates said. “She has done a wonderful job with this facility,”

Kelly Blankenship and  daugher, Keara, are volunteers who work for the shelter on weekends.

“We work at most of the adoption events,” Blankenship stated. “We try hard to find homes for the animals that are up for adoption.”

“I just love animals,” said lead intern volunteer Julia Belanger. “I have five dogs at home. When I grow up I want to be a veterinary technician.”

The shelter is open to the public from noon to 4 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Friday.

Volunteer Kelly Blankenship grills hamburgers and hot dogs for the Morgan County Humane Society No-Kill Animal Shelter’s first anniversary observance on Saturday. | Clif Knight
Volunteer Kelly Blankenship grills hamburgers and hot dogs for the Morgan County Humane Society No-Kill Animal Shelter’s first anniversary observance on Saturday. | Clif Knight
Morgan County No-Kill Animals Shelter director Robin Purdy and her volunteers pause for a photo with State Senator Arthur Orr and his children, Anna and Jack, at a first anniversary cookout and open house on Saturday. | Clif Knight
Morgan County No-Kill Animals Shelter director Robin Purdy and her volunteers pause for a photo with State Senator Arthur Orr and his children, Anna and Jack, at a first anniversary cookout and open house on Saturday. | Clif Knight
Director Robin Purdy, left, gives Amanda Parker, DVM , a tour of the Morgan County No-Kill Animal Shelter on Saturday. | Clif Knight
Director Robin Purdy, left, gives Amanda Parker, DVM , a tour of the Morgan County No-Kill Animal Shelter on Saturday. | Clif Knight

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